Brock's Monument

Brock’s Monument stands proudly atop Queenston Heights in Queenston, Ontario, Canada, and is a lasting reminder of the heroic deeds of Major General Sir Isaac Brock. This 56-meter column has become an iconic symbol of Canadian history and a testament to the courage and bravery of Major General Brock during the War of 1812.

In 1812, Major General Brock was an important leader in the defense of Upper Canada against the advancing U.S. forces. He was a British soldier who had been sent to Canada in 1802 to take charge of the military post at Fort George. He quickly rose up the ranks and was given command of the entire British military district of Upper Canada in 1807.

During the War of 1812, Brock led his troops in a number of important battles, including the Battle of Queenston Heights, where he was killed in the early morning hours of October 13, 1812. The victory at the Battle of Queenston Heights is credited to Brock for his bravery in leading his men over the river and up the heights. This battle was a turning point in the war and helped to secure Canada’s independence from the United States.

In honour of Major General Brock, a monument was erected on the site of his death in 1824. The monument was designed by the British architect William Thomas and stands 56 meters tall. It is composed of a granite stone column topped by a bronze statue of Major General Brock. The statue is flanked by two bronze figures of a British soldier and a Canadian militiaman. Below the statue is a plaque inscribed with the words “In Honour of Major General Sir Isaac Brock, a hero of Upper Canada, who fell in the Battle of Queenston Heights, 13 October 1812”.

Brock’s Monument stands as a powerful reminder of Canadian history and a tribute to the courage and bravery of Major General Brock. The monument is a popular tourist attraction and a site of historical significance to Canadians, as well as a source of pride and inspiration.